Man with a Plan

He was a teacher of Life, with a capital L—the important stuff. Oh, he loved his family, even had a profession and friends, but only a few wanted to hang with him. He was from another world and sometimes things got spooky, like when he knew what they were thinking. It took courage to stay with him, and a desire to see beyond what they could see with their physical eyes.

Life was hard, but he didn’t seem to care. He wouldn’t listen to their rants and he kept talking about love and forgiveness, beauty and joy. “Let me show you,” he’d say, and they’d sit together in a circle around a fire and listen to his stories. He seemed to be asking them to ignore the problems they had, to live and think in a whole new way, to express thanks to God for everything, even their suffering. Someone always stomped off when he talked of giving thanks for their suffering. “I will not!” they’d shout. “If God loved us, these things wouldn’t happen!”

“This world,” he would say with a sweep of his arm, “is not the real world. This is only a play, created by all of your thoughts. Only those who believe in this world are born here, for we are what we think, what we believe. How could you be born elsewhere when this is what you believe?”

“Close your eyes for a moment,” he’d say. He told them stories, which unfolded in their minds’ eyes. “Love and peace are gifts of your Father. Once you open your minds and hearts to what I am showing you, you will go and show others and they will go and show others. My work is your work. This is how the world will be healed of war.”

“The world will be healed of war?” one man asked, astonished. “How is that possible?”

“Love is irresistible and magical. It spreads in waves and when the wave hits, hearts and minds are made anew. Does this answer your question?” he’d ask.

“It is an answer, but I’m not sure I believe it.”

“Stay with me,” the beautiful, glowing man said, smiling. “And you will see it.”

Advertisements

Jiddu Krishnamurti, His Life and Work, An Overview, A Guest Post By Michael Brine

By Michael Brine
wild.brine621@gmail.com 

In today’s world, would this be a voice crying in the wilderness?

Young Krishnamurti, image courtesy of Google images

Young Krishnamurti, image courtesy of Google images

Krishnamurti was born in Madanapalle, a small town in South India, on May 11, 1895. He and his brother were adopted in their youth by Dr. Annie Besant, then president of the Theosophical Society. Dr. Besant and others proclaimed that Krishnamurti was to be a world teacher whose coming the Theosophical Society had predicted. To prepare the world for this coming, a worldwide organization called the Order of the Star in the East was formed and the young Krishnamurti was made its head.

In 1929, however, Krishnamurti renounced the role that he was expected to play, dissolved the Order with its huge following, and returned the money and property that had been donated for this work. From then on, for nearly sixty years until his death on 17th February 1986, he travelled throughout the world talking to individuals and large audiences about the need for a radical change in mankind.

Krishnamurti is regarded globally as one of the greatest thinkers and spiritual teachers of all time. He did not expound any philosophy or religion, but rather talked of the things that concern all of us in our everyday lives, of the problems of living in modern society with its violence and corruption, of the individual’s search for security and happiness, and the need for mankind to free itself from inner burdens of fear, anger, hurt and sorrow. He explained with great precision the subtle workings of the human mind, and pointed out the need for bringing to our daily life a deeply meditative and spiritual quality.

Krishnamurti belonged to no religious organization, sect or country, nor did he subscribe to any school of political or ideological thought. On the contrary, he maintained that these are the very factors that divide human beings and bring about conflict and war. He reminded his listeners again and again that we are all human beings first, not Hindus, Muslims or Christians, and that we each are like the rest of humanity—not different from one another. He asked that we tread lightly on this earth without destroying ourselves or the environment. He communicated to his listeners a deep sense of respect for nature. His teachings transcend manmade belief systems, nationalistic sentiment and sectarianism. At the same time, they gave new meaning and direction to mankind’s search for truth. His teaching, besides being relevant to the modern age, is timeless and universal.

Krishnamurti, Image courtesy of Google images

Krishnamurti, Image courtesy of Google images

Krishnamurti spoke not as a guru but as a friend, and his talks and discussions are based not on tradition-based knowledge but on his own insights into the human mind and his vision of the sacred, so he always communicates a sense of freshness and directness although the essence of his message remained unchanged over the years. When he addressed large audiences, people felt that Krishnamurti was talking to each of them personally, addressing his or her particular problem. In his private interviews, he was a compassionate teacher, listening attentively to the man or women who came to him in sorrow, and encouraging them to heal themselves through their own understanding. Religious schools found that his words threw new light on traditional concepts. Krishnamurti took on the challenge of modern scientists and psychologists and went with them step-by-step to discuss their theories and sometimes enabled them to discern the limitations of those theories. If ever there was a message that needs to be heard in today’s world, it is his.

I lived and worked in Malaysia for several years in the late 1950s, during my banking career. Along with several others, we founded a Lodge of the Theosophical Society in that country, and I can say without reservation that we held Krishnamurti in the highest regard.

Please feel free to communicate with me. Past articles are also available at: www.missionignition.net/btb.

From “The Gospel of Mary Magdalene,” Commentary by Jean-Yves Leloup

I’m reading THE GOSPEL OF MARY MAGDALENE, translation from the Coptic*, and commentary, by Jean-Yves Leloup. Mary Magdalene’s testament to the words of Christ was one the men of the early Catholic Church excluded from the Bible. (She was a woman.) Some of the dried parchment papers of her text are missing; thus, her witness account is incomplete and Leloup’s book is not long. It is powerful, however. The author’s insightful commentary, as you will see below, tends to ‘bring one up short.’ Books that help us understand both how far we are from oneness with God/Love, yet how much potential we have to become so, should be in everyone’s library.

Of note, it was a pope long ago who labeled Mary Magdalene a prostitute; this portrayal of her is written nowhere in the Bible, and the Catholic Church officially retracted this inaccuracy years ago. Leloup considers it possible that  the meaning of Mary Magdalene being ‘healed of seven demons,’ is an account of when Jesus Christ brought Mary Magdalene’s seven chakras** into alignment, as they were created to be, when a human becomes one with the Divine. Regardless, the two were obviously close, as she is the first person he speaks to after His resurrection.

Anyway, as the book has ‘brought me up short’ in every section, I thought I’d quote this paragraph and perhaps share the experience:

“Happy are those who are able to remain sensitive to the misery and suffering of others. The future belongs to the pure and gentle, not to the rigid purists of all our fundamentalism. If the latter have the purity of angels, they also have the pride of demons, like all grand and petty inquisitors who shed blood in the name of purity, religious faith, traditional values, or race. The greatest crimes against humanity are always committed in the name of goodness and the need to preserve integrity and purity. We have yet to fully appreciate the danger and delusion of purity without mercy.”
~Jean-Yves Leloup

Succinctly and powerfully said, don’t you think?

*English translation by Joseph Rowe
**Circular, spinning points of spiritual energy in our bodies, arranged from the top of our heads to the base of our spines

“The good of human life . . . “

From THE PARADOX OF INTENTION, by Marvin C. Shaw:

“The good of human life is not achieved by attempting to achieve it . . .
but by not attempting to achieve it for, on this condition, it is discovered
to be already in one’s possession.”

~Marvin C. Shaw

Disappointments and Failed Expectations, a Guest Post from the 11:11 Progress Group

Michigan, USA, October 16, 2011
Teacher Ophelius
Received by Chris

Teacher Ophelius: “Today’s message is about disappointments and failed expectations. Many times throughout your life there will be disappointments and failed expectations, even at the height of the most positive circumstances and feelings of surety that things and events will materialize as planned in your mind which would benefit you and others at a time that is most auspicious, yet somehow roadblocks and inopportune events bar the way to these predictable outcomes that perplex and dishearten your outlook. These things happen for reasons that you may not fully realize now, but will clearly see later on as alternative paths and outcomes materialize to teach lessons or exceed the expected outcome of the previously laid plans.

“There are many, many things going on in the unseen realms that shape the path of those who walk in truth and light, and many of you, my friends, are lovingly guided into the paths of righteousness by what would seem to you as harsh lessons. How many of you can look back on your life and see the hand of Spirit shaping and guiding by not giving you what you want in the time you wanted it. For a child will almost always choose candy over a nutritious meal, and it is the wise parent that will always give the healthy food first and allow the sweet treat in moderation after the body is lovingly nourished. This is how the Creator builds character in us. Spirit loves and nurtures, and fosters our progress and perfection in incremental amounts that we are ready for as we learn and make decisions that allow the next phase of our soul development to unfold in ways that will benefit us most in the overall journey to perfection.

“Many times did the Master Jesus dash the hopes of his apostles and disciples to pieces at the height of their expectations because he was wise and farseeing, knowing the outcome of what unbridled fantasies would produce and what distorted viewpoints would develop as a result of giving in to a sign and miracle seeking generation. Only in retrospect after He departed from your world did the meanings and purposes of the Master’s methods prove wise and valuable — truths that would serve the many for generations to come.

“Only by the pruning of the vine will good fruit come, and so it is for you, my friends, that you must sometimes be patient and allow events and opportunities to present themselves according to divine timing which will prove to be the greatest benefit to you and others — benefits that maximize soul progression (healthy food), not necessarily material needs and wants (candy), keeping in mind that the sweet treat will be given in moderation out of divine love, and most often does the delayed reward or outcome exceed your greatest expectations when you are prepared to meet the nurturing opportunity.”

Peace to you,
The Circle of Seven

The 11:11 Progress Group

“The giving of self, the illumination of truth, and the relief of suffering
are the noblest paths to higher consciousness.” – Teacher Ophelius, 2009

http://1111prompt.blogspot.com

An Explanation For Why We Humans Suffer, from “Autobiography of a Yogi”

I am reading a worldwide bestselling book, Autobiography of a Yogi, by Paramahansa Yogananda, the beloved guru who came to America in the 1930s to establish the Self Realization Fellowship (as in the Realization that we are made of light); and to show that the universal threads of the teachings of the great masters of the Eastern world are one with the non-manipulated teachings of the extraordinary master of the Western world, Jesus Christ.I first read the book when I was 23. I was astonished, on the one hand, by the stories of the Indian swamis, saints and gurus who, among other things, appeared in two places at one time, levitated, and manifested objects from ‘thin air;’ on the other hand, I was struck by the rigorous discipline and profound devotion to God that was prevalent in India. (Attendance at our American weekend church services is mere fellowship in comparison.) Reading the book again in later years I thought, “Is there any human who loves God more than Paramahansa Yogananda?”

I have long struggled with accepting that all the suffering in the world is an aspect of God’s teaching plan; and with the idea that Mother Nature (who, at the very least, provides us all with our sustenance) is an illusion. Every time I stand in awe of a sunset, make friends with a critter, or hug a tree, I am blessed. I want to share a passage from the book here because it is the best explanation of what is real and what is not that I’ve ever seen: Continue reading

Do We Choose Our Lives Or Not?

Yesterday, Kim P, who writes the reflective and soulful blog, Afternoon Storm, left a comment at my latest post, Hopes of the Heart (see below). She called it a powerful post and said that we humans do need to be knocked out of our complacency. In return, I said that the post probably reflected my own sense of despair over the situation in Somalia—that life-sustaining water (only a dream due to a severe drought) and food (only a dream because of militia groups) cannot reach the starving mothers and children we see on the news. My children—who have always had water and food and shelter—are at the heart of my world and I cannot fathom what these mothers must be feeling. I had asked myself, “How can these mothers know that God is Love, that God is with them, under these circumstances?”

Then, attempting to meditate this morning, I felt this: “How can I write that all humans, through their souls, in the space between lives, choose what is best for them for their spiritual growth, and then not accept this when confronted with physical horrors in others’ lives?” A friend once had a feeling that I could have lived and died through the years of the Irish Potato Famine (mid-1800s) and that I had kept telling others, “God is coming. Do not despair. God is love.” As I measured it back then, God did not come and the impression is apparently seared into my genetic memory.

At some deep level, I do know that we choose our lives for spiritual purposes and that it is through the most troubling of situations that we grow the most. Whether we live long lives or not, it is our need to know God, to know that Divine Love is real, that pulls us back toward the Heart of the universe. Yet, Divine Love is reflected also in compassion. Perhaps through these very difficult lives, these souls can, at last, climb off the reincarnation-wheel; let us pray that those who die before water and food reach them return to the Great Heart of Love at the center of the universe.