Do We Choose Our Lives Or Not?

Yesterday, Kim P, who writes the reflective and soulful blog, Afternoon Storm, left a comment at my latest post, Hopes of the Heart (see below). She called it a powerful post and said that we humans do need to be knocked out of our complacency. In return, I said that the post probably reflected my own sense of despair over the situation in Somalia—that life-sustaining water (only a dream due to a severe drought) and food (only a dream because of militia groups) cannot reach the starving mothers and children we see on the news. My children—who have always had water and food and shelter—are at the heart of my world and I cannot fathom what these mothers must be feeling. I had asked myself, “How can these mothers know that God is Love, that God is with them, under these circumstances?”

Then, attempting to meditate this morning, I felt this: “How can I write that all humans, through their souls, in the space between lives, choose what is best for them for their spiritual growth, and then not accept this when confronted with physical horrors in others’ lives?” A friend once had a feeling that I could have lived and died through the years of the Irish Potato Famine (mid-1800s) and that I had kept telling others, “God is coming. Do not despair. God is love.” As I measured it back then, God did not come and the impression is apparently seared into my genetic memory.

At some deep level, I do know that we choose our lives for spiritual purposes and that it is through the most troubling of situations that we grow the most. Whether we live long lives or not, it is our need to know God, to know that Divine Love is real, that pulls us back toward the Heart of the universe. Yet, Divine Love is reflected also in compassion. Perhaps through these very difficult lives, these souls can, at last, climb off the reincarnation-wheel; let us pray that those who die before water and food reach them return to the Great Heart of Love at the center of the universe.

Advertisements