Biodegradable, Plastic 13-Gallon Trash Bags!

I may be the last person who wanted to locate biodegradable kitchen trash bags to find them, but I Garbage Bags Picdid and they’re only about ten cents a bag more than the ones I bought at grocery stores. My daughter and I live on a small budget, but we talked about it and decided this is something we can and should make a priority. Some grocery stores offer garbage bags made from recycled products, but I hadn’t found any that are also biodegradable. Have you noticed that most grocery stores have a bin inside the entrance where you can drop off plastic bags for recycling? What a big step this is!

It is sad that much of the trash we Americans make sits, if not forever, for a very long time inside plastic garbage bags in landfills. Mother Nature tries to make soil from our garbage, but she can’t break down some of the plastics. I found the plastic, biodegradable bags at Reuseit.com, whose offices are located in Chicago—American made! The bags degrade because they’re made with an ingredient that starts the process.

Before my renewed awareness of recycling, I wanted strong garbage bags and there are tons of them, but I want to do better now. I want strong enough and biodegradable. (I did consider trash-can-sized paper bags, which are certainly the best option, but they were all too expensive for us.) I will see if the compostable plastic bags are strong enough, and will report my experiences here

UPDATE ON USING THE REUSIT.COM BAGS: https://notesalongthepath.com/2010/11/08/the-update-on-biodegradable-13-gallon-kitchen-trash-bags/

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4 thoughts on “Biodegradable, Plastic 13-Gallon Trash Bags!

  1. Pam, introducing biodegradable bags into your life are a huge step along the path (ooh, I managed to fit that in!) to making more sustainable and earth-friendly choices. I’d be curious to know how the Reuseit brand holds up at the 13 gallon size.

    We use BioBags (http://www.biobagusa.com/biodegradable-bags.html) which at the larger sizes (we pull those out for a party situation) can be fragile when handled roughly or filled with too much heft. But that’s a small inconvenience when we’re not contributing to the plastics problem.

    • Hi Debra–Thanks so much for the info and helping me learn. I’m very curious myself as to how they will work. When I take out the next bag, I’ll start using the new ones and will know within a few days how it works. I hope they work! Without the (recycled) heavier glass jars, I’m thinking they should work. Maybe I’ll do a test with glass in the bags and see what happens. It is important to know how we can make them work.

  2. Pam, so happy to see you following through on lightening your footprint on Mama Earth, and inspiring others to do so as well by setting an example of how it can be done. I’m also totally curious to find out how those bags work out for you, so please keep us posted with a follow-up.

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