The Power of the Vote

There are matters of the heart, situations that cannot be healed by brainstorming and certainly not by painting-false-pictures political ads. In decades past we humans were joined by our common needs for water, food, shelter, work. In decades past, neighbors and friends looked out for each other far more than we in America do today. I don’t mean accepting responsibility for someone down on their luck; I mean sharing for a while until they get back on their feet.

Today, ownership trumps ‘caring for the least of these.’ It is often the case that the greater the assets of a person or family, the less likely they are to share with those in need. They surround themselves in a lifestyle that protects them from having to witness the lives of the poor and the sick, whom they apparently think of as lepers. The more poor, uneducated and sick people, the more isolated the wealthy become. It is painfully sad, for people who do care, to live in times when the wealthy manipulate laws and individuals to get more of what they want from the sweat and tears of those working for minimum wage ($8/pr hour X 40 hours X 52 weeks=$16,640 per year, before taxes)–and by poisoning the earth.

I am struck two weeks before the national election by the influence of political ads, the ones created to paint a ‘caring’ picture, when the politicians could not care any less than they do–because they and their children are educated, live in safe homes and neighborhoods, travel, drive nice cars, and so on. While campaigning in our state, the Republican and Tea Party-supported candidate for the Senate spoke harshly many times about big government, even an armed resistance, and shutting down the EPA, the Dept. of Education, the Social Security system (which she refers to as ‘welfare,’ apparently forgetting that citizens’ pay into the Social Security program through payroll deductions.)

Now her ads show sad people, with her softened voice in the background saying, “These are people—not statistics.” Are voters really falling for this? Ads can and do lie—why can’t we see this? The more secrets the politicians have, the more lies they tell, the more separate they become from us and from Goodness. I’m not saying the government can solve our problems; I’m saying caring people, including caring people in the government, could dramatically change the lives of a country’s citizens for the good. Why hasn’t Congress rewritten laws, for example, to give tax breaks to corporations for keeping their companies in America?

And I often wonder, why do blue collar workers, especially those who’ve lost their jobs and homes due to the machinations of the greedy, support these wealthy Republican and Tea-Party candidates, who speak against big government, yet are mostly ‘owned’ by big corporations that make huge contributions to their election campaigns? It should be obvious by now that most wealthy politicians look out only for themselves and their campaign contributors—not for the average American. Let us vote not with and for anger, but for healing.

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2 thoughts on “The Power of the Vote

  1. Yay for speaking up! That last question, “why do blue collar workers, especially those who’ve lost their jobs and homes due to the machinations of the greedy, support these wealthy Republican and Tea-Party candidates, who speak against big government, yet are mostly ‘owned’ by big corporations that make huge contributions to their election campaigns?” is a big one. I think it’s due to a relentless pr campaign by those very rich people that no matter what, the problem is always “big government.” So when people actually fall on hard times they’ve already been so indoctrinated with that mantra that they think the government is the cause of their misery. Once you’ve painted something with such a broad brush stroke that it’s become some sort of an archetype in people’s heads, it becomes hard to look at it in terms of shades of gray anymore. Ultimately the government is supposed to be what we make it and it’s a mechanism to keep a few powerful from making their own rules and running roughshod over everyone else. There’s always room for improvement, but I’m always flabbergasted at people getting elected by saying they’re going to do away with government. Voting for someone like that is like shooting your own foot.

    Btw, great redesign of the site!

    • Indoctrination–of course! Thanks for answering my questions, Sven. It made no sense to me–even considering indoctrination, I am still, like you, flabbergasted at times.
      And, yes, I’ve organized and simplified the site so that things are easier to find, in case I don’t check in as often as I have. Hope all is well with you guys. Love, Pam

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