Profits and Respect

I was thinking this morning about production and how proud I was of us Americans, especially through my twenties. We are an innovative people who tend toward rolling up our sleeves and getting to work. Our forebears left Europe and made the dangerous journey to improve their lives; in an uninhabited land they would establish communities with the right to worship as they chose, to speak and write freely, and to bear arms. But an important motive for settling the New World was leaving behind unreasonable taxation–to work, to produce and to keep the profits. That’s an instinct, I believe. Who wants to work hard and give a large portion of his earnings to a tyrant or government?

The first settlers sent back stories of the unending potential of the New World and more Europeans came, by the droves. The motivations of grabbing unclaimed land (the natives believed God/the Great Spirit owned the land) and silver and gold called them like a Siren beckons sailors onto the rocks. Noting the profit-orientation of our country’s foundation, our economic problems caused by unchecked, rampant greed should come as no surprise.

As I grew older, I learned more of the spiritual connection of the indigenous peoples of this bountiful land, to the Great Spirit and to Mother Nature. Their stories, of being murdered, tricked and pushed off the land from which they had earned their livelihoods, is a period of sobering shame in our history. That same profit motive/misusing thread is evident in our second great inhumanity: stealing indigenous peoples from another continent and forcing them into slave-labor in the colonies/first states.

Why not produce, produce, produce/profit, profit, profit? Without balance, profit becomes a dangerous, for others,  incentive. Production without benevolence swamps our connection to our Higher Purpose and to the people we misuse on our frenzied climbs. Our true purpose for being born on Earth is to try our hand at living, to have our intentions tested, to know ourselves and our connection to the Great Spirit. We have so far to go at times it seems any kind of loving change is impossible. Yet the energy of our times is to drop selfishness like a hot potato, to open our eyes to Light and Love and to find ways to live that do not destroy ourselves, others, other forms of life, or our world. We are designed for relationship—with all.

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2 thoughts on “Profits and Respect

  1. When I first took Anthropology at UNR many, many years ago, I was appalled and ashamed of what was being done to indigenous people everywhere. And it continues. What saved me is the idea that individual souls are on their journey – what a great equalizer – something to keep in mind and it should prompt us to reach out and help everyone we come in contact with – but it sure continues to be hard NOT TO JUDGE.
    love,
    anita

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