What Do You Look Like Without a Body?

Sometimes my thoughts get going and I wonder things like, “If we could meet up without our bodies, what would we look like? Do our essences still have strong passions, strong opinions? If we couldn’t arm wrestle to see who’s right, would we, um . . . shoot fire from our eyes?”

Or, would we, from the perspective of our souls, see how thin our opinions are? Without skin, we couldn’t be racists. Without bodies, we’d see what it is we all have in common, what we really are, every single one of us: souls, cells on God’s body. In life, we may have super-powered our way to the ‘top,’ but without bodies, who’s at the top of the heap? God–to show us. If we find ourselves in a lifetime without the support of a loving family and the opportunity for a good education, who’s at the bottom after this life? God–to hold us.

READ MORE/WITHOUT BODY

AWAKE: The Life of Yogananda, a Guest Post About the New Film

I am very happy to post this information about a new film that details the life of Paramahansa Yogananda. I cannot wait to see it myself, for it was the writings of the Swami from India that opened my heart to Jesus Christ. Just as Christ did, Paramahansa Yogananda embodied divine love on Earth.

AWAKE_POSTER_11x17_GOLD-rgbA_18JUL14-smallOn January 5, 2015, tens of thousands of yogis and spiritual seekers around the world will commemorate the anniversary of Paramahansa Yogananda’s birth. Yogananda (author of the acclaimed spiritual book Autobiography of a Yogi) has been hailed as the “Father of Yoga in the West” for his pioneering role in making known India’s ancient philosophy of Yoga and its time-honored tradition of meditation.

Just as Yogananda (1893-1952) filled lecture halls to capacity across the country in the 1920s and 1930s to teach the techniques and benefits of yoga meditation, the film about his extraordinary life, AWAKE: The Life of Yogananda, is drawing thousands of filmgoers to theatres around the country today.

The award-winning film, AWAKE: The Life of Yogananda, which debuted in October 2014, details the human struggles the Swami from India faced as he traveled across the U.S. during a time of religious intolerance and racism, as well as the profound impact that his teachings still have today. He made an indelible impression on the spiritual landscape of the United States by encouraging people to seek a more personal relationship with God through meditation, a radical idea in the early 20th century. The film’s success continues to grow as spiritual seekers, yogis, and film fans alike flock to theatres across North America.

With so many seekers focused on this beloved spiritual figure’s yoga teachings as a result of the film (which has screened or is scheduled to screen in more than 85 theaters in the U.S. and Canada), the following excerpt  taken from his published writings is especially relevant as we enter the New Year:

“If you want to be loved, start loving others who need your love….If you want others to sympathize with you, start showing sympathy to those around you. If you want to be respected, you must learn to be respectful to everyone, both young and old….Whatever you want others to be, first be that yourself; then you will find others responding in like manner to you.” – Paramahansa Yogananda

The Second Coming of ChristAnother timely work is Paramahansa Yogananda’s unprecedented masterwork of inspiration, The Second Coming of Christ, which takes the reader on a profoundly enriching journey through the four Christian Gospels. Verse by verse, he illumines the universal path to oneness with God taught by Jesus to his immediate disciples but obscured through centuries of misinterpretation: how to become like Christ, how to resurrect the Eternal Christ within one’s self.

This landmark work transcends divisive sectarianism to reveal a unifying harmony underlying all true religions. A groundbreaking synthesis of East and West, it imparts the life-transforming realization that each of us can experience for ourselves the promised Second Coming — awakening of the all-fulfilling Divine Consciousness latent within our souls.

Yogananda said, “In titling this work The Second Coming of Christ, I am not referring to a literal return of Jesus to earth. He came two thousand years ago and, after imparting a universal path to God’s kingdom, was crucified and resurrected; his reappearance to the masses now is not necessary for the fulfillment of his teachings. What is necessary is for the cosmic wisdom and divine perception of Jesus to speak again through each one’s own experience and understanding of the infinite Christ Consciousness that was incarnate in Jesus. That will be his true Second Coming.”

For more information about the movie, click on www.awaketheyoganandamovie.com. To learn more about Paramahansa Yogananda and the organization he established, the Self Realization Fellowship, go to http://www.yogananda-srf.org.

Little Boy Asks, “Do the Animals Die When We Eat Them?”

Photo Courtesy of Kelly Tarlton on Wikimedia

Photo Courtesy of Kelly Tarlton on Wikimedia

From the mouths of babes:

Please click on the link below to be reminded of what love is.

It’s a short video. http://www.spiritscienceandmetaphysics.com/this-little-boy-will-change-the-way-you-think-about-animals/

The Dalai Lama’s Daily Prayer, a Guest Post

Dalai LamaThis is the prayer the Dalai Lama says every morning:

“May I be a guard for those who need protection

A guide for those on the path

A boat, a raft, a bridge for those who wish to cross the flood

May I be a lamp in the darkness

A resting place for the weary

A healing medicine for all who are sick

A vase of plenty, a tree of miracles

And for the boundless multitudes of living beings

May I bring sustenance and awakening

Enduring like the earth and the sky

Until all beings are free from sorrow

And all are awakened.”

Is there a more compassionate prayer in all the world?

Courtesy of Wikipedia:

The 14th Dalai Lama (religious name: Tenzin Gyatso, shortened from Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso, born Lhamo Dondrub,[2] 6 July 1935) is the 14th and current Dalai Lama. Dalai Lamas are the most influential figures in the Gelugpa lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, although the 14th has consolidated control over the other lineages in recent years. He won the Nobel
Peace Prize
in 1989, and is also well known for his lifelong advocacy for Tibetans inside and outside Tibet. Tibetans traditionally believe him to be the reincarnation of his predecessors and a manifestation of the Bodhisattva of Compassion.

Man with a Plan

Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

God, he was beautiful. Nobody talked about auras, but his skin almost glowed. His features were perfectly symmetrical. It was impossible to look into his eyes without your heart skipping a beat. Was he a magician? Some thought so because he looked into their souls and they felt it, a measuring of sorts. “Who are you?” his eyes asked. “How have you lived? Do you know your Father?”

He was a teacher of Life, with a capital L—the important stuff. Oh, he loved his family, even had a profession and friends, but only a few wanted to hang with him. He was from another world and sometimes things got spooky, like when he knew what they were thinking. It took courage to stay with him, and a desire to see beyond what they could see with their physical eyes.

Life was hard, but he didn’t seem to care. He wouldn’t listen to their rants and he kept talking about love and forgiveness, beauty and joy. “Let me show you,” he’d say, and they’d sit together in a circle around a fire and listen to his stories. He seemed to be asking them to ignore the problems they had, to live and think in a whole new way, to express thanks to God for everything, even their suffering. Someone always stomped off when he talked of giving thanks for their suffering. “I will not!” they’d shout. “If God loved us, these things wouldn’t happen!”

“This world,” he would say with a sweep of his arm, “is not the real world. This is only a play, created by all of your thoughts. Only those who believe in this world are born here, for we are what we think, what we believe. How could you be born elsewhere when this is what you believe?”

“Close your eyes for a moment,” he’d say. He told them stories, which unfolded in their minds’ eyes. “Love and peace are gifts of your Father. Once you open your minds and hearts to what I am showing you, you will go and show others and they will go and show others. My work is your work. This is how the world will be healed of war.”

“The world will be healed of war?” one man asked, astonished. “How is that possible?”

“Love is irresistible and magical. It spreads in waves and when the wave hits, hearts and minds are made anew. Does this answer your question?” he’d ask.

“It is an answer, but I’m not sure I believe it.”

“Stay with me,” the beautiful, glowing man said, smiling. “And you will see it.”

We Sleep-Walk, Strive, Battle and Resist our Own Truths

Two GorillasInside of each of us exists two beings, both powerful and both seeded with the potential to bring about the end of the other. This has made for some great stories about battles that take place because good and evil live within us. The most potent of these stories stir the inner Spirit, as when sweet and unassuming beings, like Frodo the Hobbit, throw themselves wholly into the quest to save the world from the destructive madness of the monstrous, pounding armies of beings like Sauron, the Dark Lord. J.R.R. Tolkien wrote The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogy in England around the world wars. I have often wondered if Frodo is a symbol for Jesus and Sauron for Hitler.

How do we humans ultimately choose which fork in the road to take? Is it a million small decisions made over a thousand lifetimes that ferry us at last either to hopelessness and a pit of despair, or into light and the joy of belonging? Is it fair that we must live with the consequences of our choices? In our many lifetimes, we have all been master and slave, criminal and judge, this or that color and race, healer and diseased, wealthy and poor–so that we may ‘walk in another’s shoes.’ Deep within, we know this. We also know everything that we’ve ever done and thought, though we must choose to see it. Thus, between lives, we request the circumstances that will stimulate remembrance and spiritual growth, personally ‘writing’ the pathways of each of our stories or lifetimes.

Why do we do this? We are spiritual beings who fell from the light who have been given some time and space to ‘go Home.’ Between lives, there is nothing more important than getting Home. But here, in these bodies full of desires, with our strong minds, we struggle. If we’re successful, we struggle with ego and the ‘number-one’ fixation. If we’re not, we struggle to survive. Forgetting that we are sons and daughters of the Loving Force that created everything in the universe, we sleep-walk, strive, battle and resist our own truths.

Is this all there is? Near-endless cycles of self-centered decisions and never-ending suffering? Is there no other way? Is group healing possible? Is there a fall-back clause tucked away in the divine manual of Universal Law that would allow for heavenly intervention to end all of our self-inflicted, painful karma?

Would it take a certain percentage of us saying, “Yes to Love!” to allow the rest to come? How would that work? We all have free will, so we likely can’t be swooped up in a love-wave. We would each have to choose. “Given the opportunity to end your suffering,” we might be asked, “would you choose to again become one with God/Love/Universe, to exist and create within the Whole, or do you choose to live in separation?”

If this was possible, what would your answer be?